Jeanette Kazmierczak

Former Editorial Producer

Abstractions blog

On the Moon’s Far Side, Clues to a Cataclysm?

A mission to collect samples from the far side of the moon could answer questions about a barrage of asteroids nearly 4 billion years ago.

Abstractions blog

The Cell’s Backup Genetic Instructions

The cell is equipped with multiple redundancies in case something goes wrong. Researchers have begun to map these systems.

Abstractions blog

Off-the-Shelf Lens Assists Dark Matter Find

A camera lens often used by wildlife and sports photographers has helped astronomers learn about dark matter and galaxy formation.

Abstractions blog

Responding Rapidly to Big Discoveries

How do scientists react to major breaking science news? For astrophysicists after the big gravitational waves announcement, it was meeting for two weeks in Santa Barbara, California.

Abstractions blog

Air Traffic Control for Random Surfaces

Mathematicians have had a hard time finding commonalities in large groups of random shapes — until recently.

Abstractions blog

Hope That an Old Drug Might Treat Zika

Scientists are having a difficult time finding a treatment for the Zika virus in part because so few drugs are safe for pregnant women. But one antibiotic has shown promise.

Abstractions blog

Handicapping the 2018 Fields Medal

Peter Scholze is a favorite to win one of the highest honors in mathematics for his contributions in number theory and geometry.

Abstractions blog

How to Grow Metal-Eating Microbes

Metal-eating microbes get energy from rocks and could teach us about life on other worlds — but first scientists had to learn how to grow them in the lab.

About the author

Jeanette Kazmierczak was Quanta's editorial producer from September 2015 to November 2017. Prior to joining the magazine, she studied specialized journalism, focusing in science, at the University of Southern California. She was previously an editorial assistant for the Global Climate Change website at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and has interned with NOVA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For two years she was the science beat reporter for the University of Georgia’s student newspaper.