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cryptography

<p>A new paper claims that a common digital security system could be tweaked to withstand attacks even from a powerful quantum computer.</p>
Abstractions blog

Why Quantum Computers Might Not Break Cryptography

A new paper claims that a common digital security system could be tweaked to withstand attacks even from a powerful quantum computer.

<p>Computer scientists can prove certain programs to be error-free with the same certainty that mathematicians prove theorems.</p>
computer security

Hacker-Proof Code Confirmed

Computer scientists can prove certain programs to be error-free with the same certainty that mathematicians prove theorems.

<p>In the drive to safeguard data from future quantum computers, cryptographers have stumbled upon a thin red line between security and efficiency.</p>
cryptography

A Tricky Path to Quantum-Safe Encryption

In the drive to safeguard data from future quantum computers, cryptographers have stumbled upon a thin red line between security and efficiency.

<p>A recent cryptographic breakthrough has proven difficult to put into practice. But new advances show how near-perfect computer security might be surprisingly close at hand.</p>
Computer Science

A New Design for Cryptography’s Black Box

A recent cryptographic breakthrough has proven difficult to put into practice. But new advances show how near-perfect computer security might be surprisingly close at hand.

<p>In a watershed moment for cryptography, computer scientists have proposed a solution to a fundamental problem called “program obfuscation.”</p>
Computer Science

Perfecting the Art of Sensible Nonsense

In a watershed moment for cryptography, computer scientists have proposed a solution to a fundamental problem called “program obfuscation.”

<p>How do you know if a quantum computer is doing what it claims? A new protocol offers a possible solution and a boost to quantum cryptography.</p>
quantum computing

The Proof in the Quantum Pudding

How do you know if a quantum computer is doing what it claims? A new protocol offers a possible solution and a boost to quantum cryptography.

<p>Computer scientists are finding that “thinking quantumly” can lead to new insights into long-standing problems in classical computer science, mathematics and cryptography, regardless of whether quantum computers ever materialize.</p>
quantum computing

Classical Computing Embraces Quantum Ideas

Computer scientists are finding that “thinking quantumly” can lead to new insights into long-standing problems in classical computer science, mathematics and cryptography, regardless of whether quantum computers ever materialize.