David Kaplan explores one of the biggest mysteries in physics: the apparent contradiction between general relativity and quantum mechanics.

What Happens if You Fall Into a Black Hole?

David Kaplan explores one of the biggest mysteries in physics: the apparent contradiction between general relativity and quantum mechanics.


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Scientist Interviews

Erik Verlinde: The Case Against Dark Matter

Erik Verlinde describes how emergent gravity and dark energy can explain away dark matter.

Scientist Interviews

Cynthia Dwork: How to Force Our Machines to Play Fair

Cynthia Dwork explains how to conduct a survey that asks people if they do embarrassing — or even illicit — things.

Scientist Interviews

Richard Lenski: A Conductor of Evolution’s Subtle Symphony

Richard Lenski discusses how he has been surprised by evolution.

Scientist Interviews

Michael Costanzo: Giant Genetic Map Reveals Life’s Hidden Links

Michael Costanzo, a biologist at the University of Toronto and a lead author on the new study, explains why it’s important to understand how genes interact.

Pencils Down: Experiments in Education

Helen Quinn: A Wormhole Between Physics and Education

Helen Quinn has blazed a singular path from the early days of the Standard Model to the latest overhaul of science education in the United States.

Pencils Down: Experiments in Education

Pencils Down: Mike Zitolo of School of the Future

Michael Zitolo is turning the way science is approached in the classroom upside down.

Pencils Down: Experiments in Education

Pencils Down: Soni Midha of East Side Community High School

In school or in life, Soni Midha wants her math students to be able to prove why something is correct.

Pencils Down: Experiments in Education

Pencils Down: Channa Comer of Baychester Middle School

Channa Comer teaches 6th-grade science. She focuses on engagement so kids will want to keep learning.

Pencils Down: Experiments in Education

Pencils Down: Aaron Mathieu of Acton-Boxborough Regional High School

Students need a chance to fail at science to learn about its process, says Aaron Mathieu.