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superconductivity

Art for "A Potent Explanation Emerges for Graphene’s Magic Angle"
Abstractions blog

What’s the Magic Behind Graphene’s ‘Magic’ Angle?

A new theoretical model may help explain the shocking onset of superconductivity in stacked, twisted carbon sheets.

Art for "With a Simple Twist, a ‘Magic’ Material Has Quietly Become the Biggest Thing in Physics"
quantum physics

With a Simple Twist, a ‘Magic’ Material Is Now the Big Thing in Physics

The stunning emergence of a new type of superconductivity with the mere twist of a carbon sheet has left physicists giddy, and its discoverer nearly overwhelmed.

A still from an animated illustration of electrons dispersing through a cuprate sample.
condensed matter physics

Universal Quantum Phenomenon Found in Strange Metals

Experiments suggest that exotic superconducting materials share a “strange metal” state characterized by a quantum speed limit that somehow acts as a fundamental organizing principle.

Sylvia Serfaty, Stefan Falke for Quanta Magazine
Q&A

In Mathematics, ‘You Cannot Be Lied To’

For Sylvia Serfaty, mathematics is all about truth and beauty and building scientific and human connections.

Q&A

An Explorer of Quantum Borderlands

Suchitra Sebastian’s searches for quantum anomalies have led to the potential discovery of a new building block of matter.

condensed matter physics

The Quantum Secret to Superconductivity

In a virtuoso experiment, physicists have revealed details of a “quantum critical point” that underlies high-temperature superconductivity.

Q&A

Taming Superconductors With String Theory

The physicist Subir Sachdev borrows tools from string theory to understand the puzzling behavior of high-temperature superconductors.

Levitating superconductor.
condensed matter physics

Decoding the Secrets of Superconductivity

Experimentalists have pinpointed the microscopic structure of waves inside high-temperature superconductors, which could be the key to understanding the complex materials.

string theory

A Strange Side to Nature

New findings suggest that beneath the surface of quantum theory lies a vibrant string theory world where some matter corresponds to black holes in higher dimensions.